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ACE Learning

Answers to commonly asked questions about ACE Learning.

How is ACE Accreditation different from previous protocols, and why isn’t it referred to as the 9th Edition?

ACE signals a fundamental shift in how NEASC approaches accreditation of international schools. Each previous edition was a slight improvement on its predecessor. ACE isn’t just an improvement; it’s a transformation of the accrediting work by schools and by NEASC. It differs by:
 

  • Articulating five “gatekeeper” Foundation Standards that are the non-negotiable essentials that schools must have in place in order to proceed to the next stage of accreditation. This is the section most similar to compliance-oriented prior protocols;
     
  • Outlining ten Learning Principles that are aspirational in nature and that challenge schools to transform practices in alignment with these Principles;
     
  • Looking for impacts on learners, and not merely on the various compliance-focused inputs and outputs as we have done in the past;
     
  • Offering a dashboard to indicate where on the continuum a school is, in relation to each of the ten Learning Principles;
     
  • Inviting schools to develop Major Learning Plans instead of producing a traditional 12-18 month self-study.

What is the sequence of the accreditation cycle under ACE, and how does it compare to the 8th Edition cycle?

While we have moved from a 10-year cycle to a 5-year cycle, the sequence is largely the same. For most schools currently accredited by NEASC, the first ACE accreditation assignment will be the Learning Principles Report due four weeks before the Learning Principles Visit – formerly called the “Preparatory (or Preliminary) Visit”. That visit is followed by the 12- to 18-month Internal Reflection (formerly called “Self-Study”). The school submits its Internal Reflection via the ACE Portal 6 weeks prior to the External Review Visit (formerly called “Team Visit”).

The External Review Visit features a NEASC team of 4-6 ACE visitors whose visit lasts four school days and results in a report commenting on the Learning Principles and on the school’s Major Learning Plans. For schools accredited only by NEASC, we also require a Foundation Standards Update to be completed by the school and checked by the Visitors. For new applicants to be accredited only by NEASC, a Foundation Standards Visit is the first step. In Year 4 following the External Review Visit, the cycle continues with a Learning Principles Visit.

Who conducts ACE visits?

While several of our NEASC/CIE professional International Accreditation Leaders conduct visits, we also rely – as in the past – on qualified, trained volunteers to conduct visits. Our visitors undergo a full-day of live training plus additional written work before we select who is qualified to conduct their first ACE visit. For the first ACE visit, a newly selected visitor will be paired with an experienced visitor. 

Learn more about getting involved as an ACE Accreditation visitor >>

What are the 4 C’s of ACE Accreditation, and what do they have to do with the process?

NEASC Visitors look for progress on the Continuum for each Learning Principle, but they also look for evidence of the 4 C’s which are:
 

  • conceptual understanding of learning
     
  • commitment to the transformational process
     
  • a capacity for change
     
  • competence to achieve it

How do the ACE Accreditation and the new CIS International Accreditation protocols work together for schools who are accredited by both agencies?

With our shared 8th Edition protocol, NEASC and CIS have used the same template and a single team working jointly while producing a single report that is then submitted to each agency. With our new protocols, we have moved from a 10-year accreditation cycle to a 5-year accreditation cycle, and from a joint process to a synchronized process: the timing for all visits still overlaps (is “synchronized”) but there are separate teams, separate portals into which schools submit information, and separate reports submitted to each agency.

For synchronized NEASC-CIS visits, the school responds to the 10 Learning Principles for NEASC, while for the CIS report, the school completes Part One; Part Two: Domains A, B, E, F, G, and I; and Part Three Conclusions. The contents of CIS Domains C, D and H are covered by the NEASC ACE Learning Principles Report.

If we know our school has a long way to go on the continuum, are we in trouble? Can a school fail ACE Accreditation?

ACE is meant to be aspirational, and recognizes that different schools will demonstrate different levels of alignment with the various Learning Principles, some at one end of the continuum ("Not Evident" or "Thinking About It") and others closer to the other end ("Living It" or "What If?"). The more likely stumbling block for a school will be in meeting the five Foundation Standards or by showing too little evidence of the 4 C's of ACE Accreditation: Conceptual Understanding, Commitment, Capacity, Competence. 

What do you mean by "learners"? Is it only students?

NEASC has been intentional with the language we use. We believe that an ACE aligned school is characterized by a community of learners. All adults including staff, teachers, parents, and board members as well as all children are constantly learning, adapting and trying new things. The organization itself is also learning, reflecting and improving itself to better serve everyone in the community. We encourage schools and NEASC visitors to approach accreditation with all learners in mind, not just the students. 

How should schools set up their Internal Reflection Committees?

There are several factors involved in how schools choose to set up their committees for the year-long Internal Reflection that leads to the External Review Visit. The goal is to involve the whole community in some way in the process. Ideally a workshop that includes all stakeholder groups would be held toward the end of the Internal Reflection as the school's report takes final shape.

The size of your learning community is one factor to consider. Some schools organize their committees around the 3 pillars of A-C-E, others have ten separate committees, one for each Learning Principle while others group principles in ways that make sense to them. The process is yours, so you can organize it in any way that will be meaningful to your community. 

For schools conducting a parallel Self-Study for CIS accreditation, we encourage you to look to combine and share committee work wherever possible, to avoid redundancy. 

Submit your questions

To assist schools now or soon to be working with the new ACE protocol, we are developing a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) to share with members. We hope to continually add content, so please send your ACE-related questions to cie@neasc.org.

Watch "Accreditation: Reflection, Review, Renewal"